Educate
Facts on Domestic Violence, Signs and Education altogether.
Safely ESCAPE out of this
website, if the abuser walks into
the room. Please use a SAFE PC.
Delete you're cookies, web history
and back track/ delete your steps
.
ALL RIGHTS,  COPY RIGHTS OF THIS WEBSITE, IMAGES, DESIGNS, AND LOGOS ARE COPYRIGHTED AND RESERVED TO SURVIVORS REUNITE OF OREGON AND SHANNON VALDEZ 2007-2016
WEBSITE DESIGNED BY
WWW.VALDEZGRAPHICDESIGN.COM
O
O
c
c
SUPPORT and click
SUPPORT or DONATE
to HELP PUBLISH our
educational Book
base on a true story.
Here:
SUPPORT and
"LIKE" our FB
FAN PAGE here:
The MORE you know, the more you are better to HELP, PROTECT and
SAVE yours or both yours and your kids lives or lives of another.
While the majority of survivors
are women, men can also be
victims. For the sake of
simplicity, we refer to the
victim/survivor as “she” and the
perpetrator/abuser as “he”
.
Social Supports for Abuse

Negative Social Attitudes

Society in general holds certain attitudes about women and their proper roles. Some of these
attitudes and stereotypes work in favor of abusers and against the women who are their
victims. The following list describes some of the negative social attitudes and practices, as
well as the abuser’s actions that are supported by the stereotypes about women:
•Rigid stereotypes and roles for men and women
•Women trained, by custom and sometimes by law, to be dependent on men
•The Cinderella-and-Prince-Charming myth
•Barriers to women in employment, government, leadership
•The view that men ought to control money, jobs, all the family’s major decisions
•The family as an institution discourages any member from leaving or divorce
•Police, doctors, schools, other institutions in society don’t always respond quickly to clues of
abuse
•Crime, poverty, and other factors make women fearful of living alone
•Tendency to over prescribe drugs for women who are abused
•The view that a woman’s role is to take care of the family, and therefore any family troubles
are the fault of the woman and are her responsibility to “fix”
•Family, friends tell the victim to try harder to be a better wife or partner
•Faith community expectations that a wife keep her marriage vows “for better or for worse”
•The view that children always suffer from divorce and keeping the family together is
imperative
EST. 2007